Ovid’s Daphne & Apollo / Icarus & Daedalus

Selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses  (revisions by late September 2019.)

  1. Commentary: Ovid’s Daphne and Apollo (I.452-567)  (beta ed. Aug 2017)
  2. Translation Sheets: Daphne & Apollo: pdf and doc formats (beta ed. Jul 2017)
  3. Commentary: Ovid’s Icarus and Daedalus (VIII.183-235) (beta ed., Aug 2019)
  4. Translation Sheets: Icarus & Daedalus: pdf and doc formats (beta ed. Aug 2019)

Eutropius’ Hannibal (Book III of Breviarium Historiae Romanae)

  1. Commentary: Eutropius’ Hannibal (beta ed., revised 14Aug19)
  2. Translation Sheets: Eutropius’ Hannibal: pdf and doc formats

 

1. This pdf is a short 14-page commentary (7 x 10 inch) of Ovid’s Daphne and Apollo with 10 lines of Latin per page and all corresponding vocabulary and notes below the text. 26 high frequency core vocabulary words are listed in the first pages of the pdf but not included in the commentary itself . This is a beta edition and has not yet been properly proofread.

2. The translation sheets for Daphne and Apollo are in pdf and doc formats. The purpose of these sheets is to provide  students an opportunity to write out translations, take organized notes, and practice scansion. The .doc format is included so that teachers may add images and other notes to embellish and add color to the students’ handouts. (There are many works of art inspired by this story from the Renaissance to the present that are worth adding.)

3. This pdf is a short 7-page commentary (7 x 10 inch) of Ovid’s Icarus and Daedalus with 8 lines of Latin per page and all corresponding vocabulary and notes below the text. This is a beta edition and has not yet been properly proofread.

4. The translation sheets for Icarus and Daedalus are in pdf and doc formats for the reasons mentioned in #2.

Eutropius

1. Eutropius’ Hannibal includes 12 pages of commentary and then 6  text-only pages (for classroom review) in the style of Ørberg’s Lingua Latina. This prose is suitable for students immediately after they have finished reviewing subjunctives.

2. The translation sheets for  Eutropius’ Hannibal included spaced lines so that readers can take notes as they read. Since there are not many lines on each page, I recommend that readers abbreviate proper names to conserve space.

Nota bene: These commentaries include all of the vocabulary below the Latin text. In future revisions, high frequency core vocabulary words will be removed from the vocabulary lists so that more space can be devoted to fuller grammatical explanations and notes on  rhetorical devices. If this appears in print, it will liked be a compilation of selections from different authors and not just Ovid.