AP Vergil

(1) College Vergil Commentary  (19 mb, pdf., beta ed.,  5Aug20)

This draft pdf includes the U.S.  Advanced Placement selections for Vergil’s Aeneid  listed below in 63 lessons with Latin text, corresponding  vocabulary, and grammatical notes in a two-page format:

  • Book 1: 1-209, 418-440, 494-578
  • Book 2: 40-56, 201-249, 268-297, 559-620
  • Book 4: 160-218, 259-361, 659-705
  • Book 6: 295-332, 384-425, 450-476, 847-899

Why 63 Lessons? These 63 lessons complement the 70 lessons in College Caesar to cover all of the Vergil and Caesar selections for the U.S. Advanced Placement course and exam. This format allows instructors to assign one lesson per day (133 lessons) and still have time for regular testing, breaks, and review before the end of the year AP exam. N.B: This commentary is copyrighted, but the Creative Commons License on pg. 2 gives you the right to copy, distribute, and print from the pdf as long as you do not change authorship or profit financially. In other words, teachers can post a copy on their class websites, and teachers and students can download and print whatever pages that they wish to use.

(2) Crowdsource Changes to College Vergil: This link opens Adobe Docs and allows anyone to pin and make comments, corrections, or suggestions to the Vergil commentary pdf. I will check these comments and update the pdf on this website regularly.

(3) Student Translation Sheets (pdf, 6Aug20) This 63-page pdf includes the Latin text with lined spaced for translation or notes—very useful for note-taking and scansion practice. Each page corresponds to one of the 63 lessons in the commentary. Readers are encouraged to print these pages back to back and take notes as they read through the commentary.

(4) PowerPoint presentations for instructors (31Jan14, .zip, .ppt)

The presentations include six lines of Vergil per slide in black font on a white background. Teachers can project these slides on a whiteboard, for example, and use colored whiteboard markers to annotate the text as they read in class. Sample #1 shows how a teacher can add simple animation (red font appears through a click-prompt) to reinforce grammar explanations offered by student in class, and Sample #2 shows how a teacher can add simple animation to provide supplement vocabulary when encouraging smoother sight-reading.

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